Resources

Websites/Blogs:

1. Academic Life in Emergency Medicine: This website is probably the most diverse, high volume EM resource in existence. Clinical cases, emergency medicine topic reviews, conversations on medical education, clinical resources (check out the ‘PV cards’!) are all featured.
2. http://www.emottawa.ca/eng/01-websites.htmlThe uOttawa Faculty of Emergency medicine lists a variety of EM educational links including lifestyle blogs, reviews of original research, educational lectures and podcasts and more!
3. Life in the Fast Lane: You can find quick summaries on just about anything ER related in their Critical Care Compendium. There is also an ECG and Tox library with plenty of information and additional resources. LITFL also offers a large database of quizzes where you can test your knowledge on various cases.
4. EM Flipped Classroom: Online modules that walk you through the approach to various EM presentations and procedures. Created by Ottawa’s very own Dr. Stella Yiu! Very interactive!
5. ILearnEMA website that has curated the highest quality and free online learning resources pertinent to the field of emergency medicine. ILearnEM provides an organized curriculum for self-study and will be of interest to medical students, residents, and staff.

6. BoringEM: A great blog style resource created by Saskatchewan EM resident, Dr. Brent Thoma. Covers a variety of EM topics at a med student appropriate level, and also discusses various issues surrounding how to make yourself a competitive applicant for emergency medicine.

7. CAEP NotesAn interactive platform that provides a synopsis of relevant topics in emergency medicine. Information can be accessed quickly and readily when you need it most.

Textbooks:
– These two are the two ‘Bibles’ of Emergency Medicine. If you pursue residency training in EM you will be making use of these resources!

– If you log into “Access Medicine” through the University of Ottawa Library Page (go to ‘database’ then click on ‘Access Medicine’ and log in with your uOttawa credentials) you can access Tintinalli online for free.

Clinical Handbooks:

1. Pocket Emergency Medicine (Lippincort)This resource is organized by chief complaint, and is helpful in forming differentials, identifying important life threatening conditions to rule out, and in guiding how to proceed with investigations and basic management.

Podcasts:

All of these podcasts can be accessed for free through iTunes or from their individual websites.

1. EM Basic: A med student/junior resident appropriate level podcast that’s aim is to cover all the ‘bread and butter’ topics in EM.
2. EMCRITThis podcast might be difficult to follow when you are first starting out in medicine, but once you get started listening to this podcast you won’t be able to stop! Dr. Scott Weingart, an emergency and critical care physician and EM educator extrordinaire talks about cutting edge advances and controversies in EM in a very easy to listen to, conversational manner. Easily one of my favourite podcasts.
3. ERCASTDr. Rob Orman takes a practical look at common EM questions.
4. PEM ED Dr. Andy Sloas, a paediatric emergency medicine physician, covers important EM topics that are unique to paediatric patients. (If nothing else, I highly recommend listening to his episodes on paediatric fever!).
5. Emergency Medicine Cases Dr. Anton Helman, an emergency medicine physician in Toronto (woot – Canadian content!) covers a variety of ‘basic’ and ‘controversial’ topics in EM.
6. The Skeptic’s Guide to Emergency Medicine Dr. Ken Milne, a CFFP-EM that practices in rural south-western Ontario, critically appraises current and classic/practice changing articles relevant to emergency medicine. Great resource for learning some of the EM literature, and for developing an approach to critical appraisal.
7. SMART EM: Once you feel like you have mastered the basics of EM, check out this podcast. Dr. David Neuman conducts ‘deep dives’ into the literature to get a better look at what the evidence really says about controversial topics in EM. Warning: podcasts are a little bit on the long side (50-100 minutes) but they are anything but boring!

8. The Ultrasound PodcastTwo goofy EM docs teach good doctors how to be even better by incorporating point of care ultrasound into their practice.

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